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RUN. ROW, RACK'em Up For Rotary
 

Join us for a FIRST OF ITS KIND ROTARY FUN-RAISER! We will be working out at Orange Theory Fitness! Never tried it before...thats great. President Elect Sari Medick is a proud member of Orange Theory Albany, and is excited to Rack Up the Miles to Reach out for Rotary!

Donation to District 7190 Rotary E-Club will earn you a chance to help us Walk, Run and Row miles to Reach new distances with our Literacy Project and more.

With E Club Members over seas - we are going to see how far a group effort work out can get us to reaching one of our members.

$25 Minimum Donation to participate in our on site event. This event is limited to 25 participants at the venue, unlimited opportunities to participate Virtually!

Are you not one to work out, you can buy your miles too and support the e club!

VIRTUAL RUNNING - $1 PER MILE.
MIN 10 MILES

Every dollar raised goes towards our E Club and all of the amazing work it does.

Questions? Contact President Elect Sari Medick at capdjsarisparks@gmail.com or 518-248-9584

 

Orangetheory Fitness
1704 Western Ave
Albany, NY 12203

Profile: A vine idea

Heidi Kühn
Rotary Club of San Francisco

Heidi Kühn arrived in Utsunomiya, Japan, in 1975, a few months after the end of the Vietnam War. She was a Rotary Youth Exchange student, and what she saw and experienced in Japan led her to reflect on the post-World War II reconciliation between that country and her native United States. “The idea of former enemies bridging borders for peace left an impression in my heart,” she says.

Heidi Kühn, of the Rotary Club of San Francisco, founded a nonprofit called Roots of Peace to remove land mines and revive farmland.

Photo by Ian Tuttle

More than 20 years later, Kühn had become a successful television journalist. She was asked by the Commonwealth Club of California, a well-known public affairs forum, to host an event featuring Jerry White, a land mine survivor who had escorted Princess Diana on her last humanitarian mission in 1997. It was a short time after the death of Diana, whose efforts to ban land mines had inspired Kühn. “That night, I made a prophetic toast,” she recalls. “‘May the world go from mines to vines.’”

Kühn decided to act on those words and founded a nonprofit called Roots of Peace that has worked to remove hundreds of thousands of land mines and other unexploded ordnance from farmland and replace them with productive fields, such as orchards and vineyards.

In Afghanistan, the organization has helped restore fields in the Shomali Plain north of Kabul, which had been a thriving agricultural region until the Taliban burned vineyards, cut down fruit trees, and laid land mines. Since 2003, Roots of Peace has connected growers with supermarket chains in India. 

Roots of Peace is also partnering with the Rotary clubs of San Francisco and Bangkok Klongtoey, Thailand, which received a $197,000 global grant from The Rotary Foundation to remove land mines and plant black pepper vines and taro in Vietnam’s Quang Tri province, and help farmers market the high-value crop.

Kühn and her husband and Roots of Peace partner, Gary Kühn, visited Afghanistan in 2018 to see the fruits of their labor. They flew out of Afghanistan on a cargo plane carrying the harvest. 

“To me, that was the greatest inspiration, the greatest moment in my life, to know that we can turn dreams into reality,” Kühn says. “Not just for ourselves, but for countless farmers and families around the world.” 

— Nikki Kallio

• Read more stories from The Rotarian

What is the Rotarian Action Group for Peace?

The Rotarian Action Group for Peace is an action-driven group of Rotarians, Rotarians’ spouses and Rotaractors working together for the purpose of advancing peace and preventing wars throughout the world. The Rotarian Action Group for Peace was formed in 2012 as a group of Rotarians, recognized by Rotary International, focused on providing a network and resources to further the peace and conflict resolution work of Rotarians around the globe.

The Rotarian Action Group for Peace is an official entity that empowers and supports the peace work of Rotarians by offering structure, guidance and resources to further their peace efforts. Rotary International has a very strong commitment to peace efforts around the world. One of the objectives of The Rotarian Action Group for Peace is to forge a path for existing Rotary peace programs, such as the Rotary Peace Fellows, to become involved directly with Rotarians and their activities.

The Rotarian Action Group for Peace provides a global network for its members to partner with:

  • Rotary Peace Fellows
  • Rotary Youth Exchange Participants
  • Group Study Exchange
  • New Generations
  • Rotary sponsored program participants
  • Civil society organizations around the world
  • Other peace-minded citizens

What is a Rotarian Action Group?

A Rotarian Action Group (RAG) is an autonomous, international group, recognized by Rotary International, with a passion for a particular type of service. Rotarian Action Groups provide assistance and support to Rotary clubs and districts in planning and implementing service projects in their respective areas of expertise.

For much more about the RAGFP click here

'Positive Peace' Club Project Proposal

During the past few months Rotary International introduced the Positive Peace Academy in conjunction with Rotary strategic partner, the Institute for Economics and Peace.
 
What is the Positive Peace Academy? 
 
As described by Laurie Smolenski Outreach and development officer at the Institute for Economics and Peace, and Rotary Foundation alumna, The Rotary Positive Peace Academy is a training course to educate Rotarians on the IEP’s technical research on positive peace. The goal is to help Rotarians use these concepts to improve their peace building and development work in their own communities. 
 
The content was created by the IEP, but it has been developed with Rotarians in mind. It includes stories of Rotarians’ projects so Rotarians will be able to recognize themselves and their work as they go through the academy.
 
The back story - over the past few years our club transitioned from a traditional club charted in 1924 to the EClub concept of meeting electronically using various technologies making these types of meetings possible.
 
W have members in India, Mexico, Canada, and several United States.  Staying engaged with each other is a challenge sometimes.  We continue to do various projects around our hub communities but this does not always satisfy our global members.  This past Rotary year we were challenged by Frank 'Alaska' Quinn, our club president, to do self-directed service projects - excellent idea to recognize the service we each do every day but even I, a self-starter all my life, had trouble staying motivated without some interconnection with my club members.  Sure I see Rotarians almost everyday but not those from my club.
 
And then I heard from longtime friend and major self-starter, Dolly Jordan (club member from Boynton Beach, FL) who was asking about the Rotary Positive Peace Academy.  We talked about it for a long time, getting very excited about the possibilities:
 
What if each member signed up for the no cost, self-paced course??  It fit in with the direction our club follows - literacy, education, clean water, maternal and child health, helping children at risk.
 
We had a good basis in Peace also with Jaimen McMillan, director of Hands in Peace, an organization active in bringing peace festivals to children around the world and longtime club member.
 
We hope ALL our members will take a look at the videos below describing the Academy and guidelines.  AND get as excited as we are.
 
On July 1 I plan to sign up for the Rotary Positive Peace Academy and begin the journey to a deeper understanding of the meaning of positive peace.  I wonder where it will lead?
 
Join us.
 
Next week - the Rotarian Action Group for Peace
 
 

Former Royal Marine, Baz Gray, has just completed the first phase of an amazing Antarctic trek to the South Pole, and he has been partly sponsored by Rotary.

 

By Dave King
Published Date: February 20, 2019
 
 
 

Rotary’s two official mottoes

 
 

Service Above Self and One Profits Most Who Serves Best, Rotary’s official mottoes, can be traced back to the early days of the organization.

In  1911, the second Rotary convention, in Portland, Oregon, USA, approved He Profits Most Who Serves Best as the Rotary motto. The wording was adapted from a speech that Rotarian Arthur Frederick Sheldon delivered to the first convention, held in Chicago the previous year. Sheldon declared that “only the science of right conduct toward others pays. Business is the science of human services. He profits most who serves his fellows best.”

The Portland gathering also inspired the motto Service Above Self. During an outing on the Columbia River, Ben Collins, president of the Rotary Club of Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, talked with Seattle Rotarian J.E. Pinkham about the proper way to organize a Rotary club, offering the principle his club had adopted: Service, Not Self. Pinkham invited Rotary founder Paul Harris, who also was on the trip, to join their conversation. Harris asked Collins to address the convention, and the phrase Service, Not Self was met with great enthusiasm.

At the 1950 Rotary International Convention in Detroit, Michigan, USA, two slogans were formally approved as the official mottoes of Rotary: He Profits Most Who Serves Best and Service Above Self. The 1989 Council on Legislation established Service Above Self as the principal motto of Rotary because it best conveys the philosophy of unselfish volunteer service. He Profits Most Who Serves Best was modified to They Profit Most Who Serve Best in 2004 and to its current wording, One Profits Most Who Serves Best, in 2010. 

 

 

 

 
 
10th December as you are aware is celebrated as Human Right Day as well as conferment of Noble Peace prize to His Holiness the Dalai Lama. We celebrate this day as the conferment of Noble Peace Prize since 1989. This year is the 29th conferment of Noble Peace Prize to His Holiness the Dalai Lama.The day is a gazetted holiday day and our school actively participate in the celebration in the public celebration at the main temple of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Central Tibetan Administration civil staff completing 25 years of service are publicly honored. We also have guest of honor from Indian Parliament. This year we had a team of Human Right Committee executive  members from Congo. 
 
After formal speeches from our government there are series of cultural performances. This year our teaching staff took part for the performance as we do not want to disturb our students because of their upcoming annual examination. I have uploaded the performance by our staff.

What Do You Do When You Have A Dream?

 
There are many ways to carry out your dram or your vision.  Here is just one  of those stories and it's a local Upstate NY story too.  It's about sense of purpose, perseverance, family and most of all love.
 
So many people have ideas to do good in the world.  Here's the real life story of a young woman who made her dream come true.  Watch the video and then check out the Bakery for their recipe for success.  It is also an excellent explanation of Autism and social enterprise.  

Shelterbox and Rotary extend our partnership in the Philippines

 

ShelterBox and Rotary International are Project Partners in Disaster Relief.  By working together, we are ensuring that no family is left without shelter after disaster.  Not only do Rotary and Rotaract clubs around the world support ShelterBox financially, but on many of ShelterBox’s deployments local Rotarians, Rotaractors and Response Teams work closely together at an operational level. Rotarians often have great connections with communities and authorities that can help response teams understand the situation and respond better together.

Recently, in the Philippines, ShelterBox and Rotary have taken this partnership to the next level. ShelterBox has deployed disaster responses in the Philippines on twenty-five separate occasions. To innovate our responses, ShelterBox Operations Philippines was set-up as an in-country organization with aid stored locally so that we can respond more effectively.

Dave Ray, Horizon’s Lead at ShelterBox said:

“Rotary has been involved in the creation of the new agency in the Philippines since way before its actual invention. We have worked with Rotarians on all of our responses in the past so it is a very natural thing for us to go to Rotarians and ask for their advice when we were beginning the process.”

ShelterBox Operations Philippines, a locally registered ShelterBox office, was set up with a plan to create a network of local Rotarian Coordinators. In this way, when a disaster hits in the Philippines, our response can begin almost immediately.

When Tropical Storm Urduja hit the Philippines it caused flash flooding, landslides and destruction. The Rotary Club of Biliran Island started their response shortly after the storm passed by providing food, water, and health kits. They were quickly in contact with the local Rotarian Coordinators who coordinated with ShelterBox HQ Operations and the in-country Response team, who then started the ShelterBox Operations Philippines response.

There are many ways for Rotarians and Rotaractors to partner with ShelterBoxGain inspiration from fellow members and contact ShelterBox to get involved.

 

It's Youth Services month and this story about Rotaract demonstrates the work of this organization of younger Rotarians.  This high energy club in Argentina worked together to make a difference in people's lives.  Their experiences, told in the story below, 
Hen Power
 
A thought-provoking look at a therapy designed to help alleviate loneliness and depression.    This idea has spread throughout England and Wales and all the way to Australia.  
 
What do you think?  Comment on our June Wall please.
 
When I first saw these photos and read how the children of this Tibetan Children's Village school in India gathered to welcome visitors I realized that children everywhere and yes, perhaps schools most places welcome visitors in similar ways - flags, gifts, happy faces, lots of pictures, assemblies.  
 
So among our differences we can celebrate similarities as well.  Thanks to EClub member, Phuntsok Namygal, Data Administrator of the school, for these lovely photos and our story of the week.
 
STORY
TCV Welcomes US Congressional representative Lleana Rose Lehtinen and Rep. Claudia Tenney along with her team today in the afternoon. We are very happy to have them in the midst of our very innocent and loving children welcoming them with flags held high as they possibly can reach.
A Note from Pep - This letter from our District Governor resonated with me because I also believe that Rotary is something you must experience, an emotional connection.  For me it was a little 3rd grade girl who kissed the dictionary I gave her.  That was my Rotary 'aha'  moment.  I carry that picture in my heart.
 
For others it's the drop of polio vaccine or seeing a family take their first drink of clean water or watching a child put on a new warm winter coat.  For others it's traveling to assist communities to build computer labs, or pioneering conservation projects and community development and for others it's moving us towards peace.
 
Having just inducted two new members into our Rotary family I also feel responsible for helping them find the Truth of Rotary to enrich their lives.
 
Have YOU had an 'aha' Rotary moment?  Please share it on our November wall.
 
Welcome to our Rotarian Visitors from Around the World!
 
You are in good company!  As an EClub we make it very easy to make up missed meetings. Each week there is a new e-Bulletin that serves as our meeting forum. There are also many archived bulletins. You can select any of these marked Weekly Meeting Activities on the right Menu bar as a Make-Up.  
 
After spending roughly 30 minutes on the website, please fill out this form and send to our secretary Camilla Lake. She will forward the necessary documentation to your club secretary to credit attendance.
 
Have you checked out our Flag Counter at the bottom of this page?  Stop in and let us know where you are from.
 
We are striving to be convenient and accessible while still living up to the highest ideals of Rotary. Please visit again soon!